THE

Managing
Partners
podcast

Episode # 203
Interview on 06.28.2022

Hosted By
Erik J. Olson

Featuring Attorney

Bill Umansky



Managing Partner of
The Umansky Law Firm

About Bill Umansky

William D. Umansky is the Managing Partner at The Umansky Law Firm in Orlando, Florida.

“The Lawman” as he is affectionately known by his peers has almost two decades of experience offering “Second Chances” to clients who have either been injured as a result of someone else’s negligence or who have, unfortunately, been charged with a crime. He has appeared or been quoted in many national media outlets including USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, People Magazine, NBC, CBS, ABC and FOX affiliates around the country. Recently, Bill was named a Top Criminal Lawyer by Orlando Home and Leisure Magazine. Bill is a lawyer, entrepreneur, business owner and number one Amazon best selling author of “Power Principles of Success”.

Learn from his expertise and what trends are helping grow his firm on this episode of The Managing Partners Podcast!

Watch the Episode

Episode Transcript

Erik J. Olson:

Hey, everybody. I am Erik J. Olson, your host for this episode of The Managing Partners Podcast. In this podcast, we interview America’s top managing partners to find out what they’re doing to run their business, grow their business, and keep their case pipeline full. And today I’ve got an Instagram buddy that’s coming on, a PI lawyer out of Florida, Bill, the lawman.

Bill Umansky:

Hey, guys. What’s up?

Erik J. Olson:

What’s going on, Bill?

Bill Umansky:

Doing good, man. Just can’t wait to get this thing going and talk to you, man, because I am jealous that you’re a handsome guy with no hair that looks better than me. I’ve been trying to figure out how I can work my mic to look better, but I just can’t look as good as you.

Erik J. Olson:

All right. That’s going to have to turn into the clip from this whole interview. I’m going to be blasting that all over Instagram, man. I appreciate it. Thank you. Hey, tell us a little bit more about yourself and what you do.

Bill Umansky:

Yeah, so I run a 30-person firm here in Orlando, Florida. We do primarily personal injury and criminal defense, some administrative work as we’re getting into that, representing professionals with license defense. We’ve got a slogan, everyone deserves a second chance. Like you, buddy. But that’s our slogan, everyone deserves a second chance. And been around since 1999 actually.

Erik J. Olson:

All right. Actually, I was just talking to someone that works for us about 1999, 2000 timeframe. That’s when I got into this internet thing. It was relatively new at the time. My guess is that when you started, you probably didn’t mess with the internet much as far as trying to get business out of it. Is that an accurate assumption?

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. When I first started, I didn’t go, no, I wasn’t actively getting clients from it. I used it as a search tool and had a web set up that was like a brochure, but didn’t really spend as much time as I could have getting on it, on the bandwagon right away. Yeah, that’s right.

Erik J. Olson:

What was it like for you when you first started your law firm? Were you focused on personal injury, and did you get a lot of referrals? Is that how you built the business up?

Bill Umansky:

I was a prosecutor and worked for a PI firm, and initially I was a working trial lawyer. I had over 100 trials as a prosecutor. And then got into defense work, enjoyed it, huge ego at the time, huge win record, was an unbelievably great trial lawyer and a stupid human being. So I had no emotional intelligence. I had a huge ego. I got my business all from word of mouth and was able to charge and set prices higher than even, I got to tell you, even than what we charge now for the same kind of thing. And then got into personal injury because I had worked for some PI people and slowly started developing that. Lost my ego and as well as my hair over the years and started developing the most important thing, dude, which is emotional intelligence.

Erik J. Olson:

I can definitely tell you have very high EQ, very relatable. Just for the audience’s benefit, we were chatting for 20 minutes before I hit record. Very easy to have a conversation with you, that’s for sure. I can empathize with things like having an ego at a younger age. And it is interesting, certainly as you’re starting a journey or a couple years into it, for me, I was the same way. And I think it’s interesting how that shifts over time. I’m just like you. As time went on, and I started to get a couple wins under my belt, I didn’t feel like I had to broadcast my success quite as much. I felt I got more confidence, and the ego kind of, I mean, you’re still there, but I was able to control it, I guess. Do you feel the same way?

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. I mean, I’m a big fan of stoicism. I’m not sure I 100% agree with everything. Just like every philosophy, every religion, you have to have faith and belief, but there’s also aspects of certain things that you can’t take everything. So stoicism is about putting down your ego. Ryan Holiday’s got a great book about that, The Ego Is Your Enemy, and he’s got some follow-up books. So yeah, I do find that, and I think that’s important. And I will tell you, it helps because business is tough. It goes up and down. And when you’re down, during your down periods, if you have a huge ego, you can have the propensity to crash either through drugs, alcohol or just running away or doing whatever.

Bill Umansky:

If you don’t have an ego, or your ego’s been lessened, you get down in the weeds, and you’re always humble and you just know, look, this is a time, it’s a phase, and I’ll get through it if I work hard and continue to … It’s not about me. It’s about the people we work with. It’s about our clients. It’s about our friends. It’s about our family. It’s not us being the greatest digital marketers or the greatest lawyer or anything like that. So it does help. It’s kind of selfish actually. It’s a good way of coping through the world, so if that makes any sense.

Erik J. Olson:

Absolutely. And certainly coming out of, well, hopefully we’re coming out of COVID. We’re recording this in December 2021. This may not come out for a couple weeks or months. But during the beginning of COVID, I know the personal injury lawyers that we spoke with, I’m sorry, that are clients, but also the ones that we’ve interviewed here had a difficult time at the beginning of the COVID. The courts were shut down. And without, I guess, the threat or the possibility of trials, makes negotiating a little more difficult. Did you experience that as well?

Bill Umansky:

Yeah, so we did, Erik. I’ll tell you a couple different, interesting takeaways, and we’re not out of it yet, I don’t think, but a couple interesting takeaways for some of your lawyers, I think, that might be useful for some of the people listening to this. Yeah, PI was hurt bad. Our criminal practice was decimated because they had lockdowns and people didn’t want to spend money. They were scared. No one was arresting anyone for anything. You’d think that with riots and all that other stuff, no, people weren’t getting charged or anything. We had to come to a point where we almost had to shut down. So I always grade my employees on their ability. Do they get it? Do they want it? Do they have the capacity? But I came up with a COVID grade too. And what I found was that not always your highest achievers were your best COVID grades, meaning how do you respond when shit hits the fan, and things are really bad, and you’re telling your employees that you’re all going to have to take a pay cut, including the lawyers?

Bill Umansky:

So we didn’t give our people a pay cut. We gave the lawyers a pay cut. I took that same pay cut. And there was no sneaking distributions in the back either. Because I can tell you, my wife was pissed that I took us all the way down. She’s a lawyer in the firm as well. But we had this COVID grade. And I found during that time that it was interesting because you could judge people on their character, and they weren’t always your A employees by the way, which makes it very different. But as we’re going through this process, it makes me think about who I’d let go first, the next time a huge crisis came about. Does that make any sense?

Erik J. Olson:

Absolutely. Yeah. We went through the same process for us here in Virginia Beach, Virginia. It arrived on March 16th, 2020, and it came immediately. Call after call from our clients, pause this, stop that, get me out of this contract. And for about two or three days, it was putting out fires and chaos. And as a advertising and marketing agency, I felt very vulnerable. We actually ended up doing quite well. And after about three days of that, I changed from defense to offense, and we doubled down on our marketing. But I did have to tell our employees, “Hey, prepare. Prepare for some rough times. I don’t know what’s going to happen, but we’re going to keep this thing together as well as we can.” And we didn’t have to lay anyone off, thankfully. But yeah, it was a tough time. And it required me to come up with a different mindset because everybody was saying, “This is the big one that we’ve always heard about.” And it was scary, right?

Bill Umansky:

I think it’s still scary, but I just choose not to live in fear. I mean, whatever’s going to happen is going to happen. I mean, turnover is difficult too. You could lose key employees, they’re leaving, sometimes there’s a season for change. So not only an external force, it could be internally. And I think it’s just a mindset, how you live life. I mean, the thing with COVID was really in the end of the day, what’s the worst that’s going to happen? I mean, death? So that puts everything in perspective. So the reality is, it’s your business, you have to survive. But I mean, does it really matter if you’re dead? So to me, I take the little big lessons out of small events, and I take little lessons out of big events, whatever the hell you want to call it.

Bill Umansky:

But COVID has been something that I think has been a game changer for my mindset because, I mean, you had to pivot, you had to learn and you had to move forward. And obviously when I say we’re not out of it, I’m not being negative. We just don’t know. I live in a state that we don’t want to get into politics. I’ll just tell you, I’m happy that I live down here. For whatever reason, we’re choosing to go a different route. And I will tell you that there may be benefits and disadvantages to it. But from a mindset thing, even people that don’t agree with our governor, there’s less fear going on here. It’s crazy. It’s almost like come along or don’t. Now that could be crazy. There’s other states that have shut down completely, and I’m not judging that. I’m just saying, I wonder what it would be like. Because during that time when we had a lot of shutdowns here, there was a lot of depression, a lot of anger and it just was horrible.

Erik J. Olson:

Agreed. Do you have a group of peers, like a mastermind that you get together with? And did you have that in place going into COVID that you could lean on them?

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. You may be familiar with this. I was in a coaching program called Strategic Coach by Dan Sullivan. He was actually the guy that taught Gino, and then Gino opened Traction, which is EOS. [crosstalk 00:11:35]. Yep, the EOS system. Through that journey, I joined John Fisher’s mastermind, and that is dovetailed now into my own mastermind called The Lawman’s Lounge mastermind. And also I now facilitate masterminds for maybe four other lawyers around the country. So I facilitate them. So having that support network during this time was instrumental because when you give to others, they’re willing to give back. So yes, John’s group, Mario Godoy’s group, my group, there’s something off the top of my head, the person, if he listens he’s going to be pissed off, but I facilitate them. So yeah, we had that. I don’t know about you, but that support was critical during the last couple years. Absolutely.

Erik J. Olson:

Yeah. I’m a member of the Entrepreneurs’ Organization and they were incredible. Everyone just jumped in, and we were providing information to thousands of members all at the same time through our internal chat and messaging system about what’s going on. I heard this is going to happen, PPPs coming down the pike. If I hadn’t have had that group of people, I probably wouldn’t have taken advantage of any of the programs that the government put out, just because I would’ve been like, “Ah, it’s bureaucracy, whatever.” But I really got a lot of good information. The founder of EO, Entrepreneurs’ Organization, Verne Harnish, the author of Scaling Up, which is very similar to Traction, he did a webinar and spoke directly to us about his recommendations on what we need to do right now. So really insightful to be a part of a peer group of other business owners that are going through the exact same thing you are, and valuable. So that’s really interesting that you’ve gone through that progression and now you have a mastermind and you facilitate other masterminds.

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. Erik, it’s funny, I forgot one of the key takeaways from all of that was the PPP stuff. Because as you know, every single day there was a change in the legislation, and without having an up to date, there was a guy that was a digital marketer, who he was doing it to build a list, but he brought on a very, very experienced PPP governments benefit lawyer. And that was helpful also because we had up to minute, day by day, it felt like day by day, I think it was week by week. But it felt like we got that information. Then that was a key thing because a lot of us wouldn’t have survived without that PPP loan, and it certainly was helpful during the time to get it and yeah, you’re right.

Erik J. Olson:

Yeah. So for as much frustration as the government can be sometimes, as a business owner and for managing partners that are watching or listening, I think we’re all grateful for what they did back in 2020. It was pretty helpful, that’s for sure.

Bill Umansky:

100%, right? Yeah.

Erik J. Olson:

Well, hey, let’s shift a little bit. I think you do a really good job of your marketing. I found you. I was introduced to you by John Fisher because I interviewed him a few weeks ago. But then I found you on Instagram, and I started following you, and you’re doing some interesting things. One of the things that you did recently was you got a limo. It says, I think, the lounge, is it the Lawman Lounge? Is that-

Bill Umansky:

Yes. It’s a concept. Yeah. I have a podcast called the Lawman’s Lounge, and we had started this maybe two or three years ago. And the idea, I like cocktail bars, I like other bars, but I just like all kind of bars. And I’m not a big drinker actually, but I like going to bars and lounge type bars, speakeasies, craft cocktails, because the bartender knows their craft, and they’re quiet places, sometimes there’s some good EDM music, some chill lounge music, just different kind of things. So the concept of Lawman’s Lounge is that the lounge will travel wherever we are. So whether it’s on YouTube or whether it’s in our office, whether it’s in a mastermind or whether it’s a lunch seminar for lawyers, the lounge travels. So we wanted a vehicle that would represent visually the traveling lounge.

Bill Umansky:

So I bought a white limo, and no one buys white limos. And this was right during when COVID hit, so people weren’t using limos. So I bought this huge ass Durango stretch limo. And I won’t tell you what it cost because that’s the beauty of it. But it was like a wedding limo, and all my friends used to make fun of me. So I wrapped it blue. Carly, my executive assistant, it was one of her ideas, and we just call it the Lawman’s Lounge, and we’re going to start podcasting in it and traveling. I sometimes drive it, I’ll drive some of my lawyers around town in it, and I have a chauffeur cap. But the point of the lounge is I lend the vehicle out to people, so that they can go to events. I lend it to clients, lawyers, but I also will use it to podcast. And that’s our next use of the vehicle.

Erik J. Olson:

I love it. I think it’s a great idea. One of the things about marketing is you really need to stand out. You got to do something different. If you play it safe and you do what everyone else does, the best you can do is blend in. And the whole point of marketing is to stand out. So some PI lawyers, it’s all about, “I’m going to fight for you,” like bears and tanks in the back. I’ve seen those commercials. I think you’re taking a different approach, which I really like. When it comes to social media, is that a driver of leads for you?

Bill Umansky:

Social media, is it a driver for leads? One of the most disappointing things about marketing for us, I’m a grassroots marketer. I have a dichotomist practice. So criminals, a lot based on former clients, lawyers, but then a huge mix of digital LSAs, PPC, organic search, Google local, blah, blah. My PI marketing until recently is 95% word of mouth, grassroots marketing. So social media has been great, as far as getting me out there and letting people know the lawman, which is my nickname that I’ve had for years, but never owned it until two or three years ago when I started not giving a fuck about what other people think. But I’ll tell you, it has been the biggest disappointment as it relates to getting leads when you’re paying a third party service to do it.

Bill Umansky:

They do a masterful job, all these companies, I’ve spent as minimal as $500 on a third party VA from Czechoslovakia to five or 10 grand a month on a local … not a local company but companies in our area to drive that social media, I mean, and sophisticated, video and watch the video, cut the video down, the more your pool of people, the more people that … all that BS. I still can’t shake a lead out of that. I could shake tons of leads. None of them are qualified. So for me, that’s been frustrating. I’ve used a lot of different companies. Now, when you say a driver, yeah, it’s a driver. Is it trackable? It’s like a billboard. You got to put yourself out there. People know what you’re doing.

Bill Umansky:

It’s not really a comfortable space in the sense that I like to brag about ourselves. So I don’t do a good job on my Bill is the lawman, letting people know that I am a personal injury lawyer and criminal lawyer, that I run a firm. So I’ve been doing more of that now, sharing my firm posts to my pages and letting people know and accepting that that’s just part of life. But is it a driver? Yeah. I’ve made lots of connections, lots of referral sources. Lawyers like to send me work after they get to know me. I use the podcast on social media as a way to meet lawyers, similar to what you do. You meet different interesting people. So to answer your question, I think I just answered it.

Erik J. Olson:

Instagram’s a really interesting one as far as social media goes. It’s certainly the hot one these days. I’ve personally walked away from Twitter, which is historically where I did a lot of my social media, and focused on Instagram and trying to build it up. But you have these different parts of Instagram actually. So you have posts, you have reels and you have stories. There’s other parts that they add or remove as time goes on. But one of the things about, well, like with stories in particular, since they’re ephemeral, they only last for 24 hours, that seems like a really good place where you can do your selling, right?

Erik J. Olson:

So you come on, “Hey, have you been hurt in an accident?” Or take some of your firm content, put it out on a story. And then it just disappears, which is great because when someone goes to check you out, they’ll basically look at your feed, which is that curated look and feel. And they may only see one of those sales stories. So that’s a tactic that we’ve been taking. I actually picked that up from Gary Vee years ago. That’s the place to sell is in stories, not in the posts. And then reels, it seems to really be the only place you can get discovered these days on Instagram because otherwise you have to follow [inaudible 00:22:00].

Bill Umansky:

I don’t buy followers. I’m trying to grow my thing organically. There’s a lot of influencers that are adding onto their profile by doing stuff. But I will tell you an interesting story about reels. I put up a reel about me cooking the other day, and it was good, it had a good content. But I put up one about potato leek soup, me cooking, using knife skills, not the last one. And I looked at it. I’m like, over 9,000 views.

Erik J. Olson:

Yeah. Crazy, huh?

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. And the one I did with pasta had like 1,000 views. But I was shocked.

Erik J. Olson:

Gosh.

Bill Umansky:

Yeah, it’s like you’re onto something with the reels. And you’re right. I mean, it does make a difference. I will tell you, I have a lawyer in my office, Erik, who does TikTok, Rachel Mattie, and it’s hilarious. I think her highest review video is $4.7 million. If you ask her if she got a case, she would tell you no. But-

Erik J. Olson:

Yeah. Or who knows, right? Yeah.

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. But these reels are an interesting place. I like them. And it’s hard. I think what’s hard with this media is that it requires you to do some of the work. You could get someone, a VA or someone to assist you with it. But I mean, it’s hard when you have, I mean, that’s not your only thing going on. And my thing of creating TikToks and doing the technical stuff, I don’t really want to deal with that shit. But that reel that you just showed your audience is actually me putting stuff together. It wasn’t that creative. It was just like, here’s what I do. Here’s a recipe because I have a lot of passion for it. I mean, it got a ton of likes and a ton of views. I was shocked. So I just put up my roasted butternut squash, thinking, “Shit, this is easy.” And I posted at the same time, maybe an hour later and only got a 1,000. I’m like, what the fuck?

Erik J. Olson:

Yeah. I can’t really figure it out. I look at my insights to see when my audience comes online, and they basically come online at about 6:00. They stay until about 10:00. Doesn’t seem to drop off. But what I found is 6:30 a.m., well, it’s the perfect time, unless Instagram doesn’t want to give me credit for that time, for that content, for the same hashtags. Yeah. I haven’t really quite figured out reels, but I’m working on it.

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. It’s fun though. I love cooking, and I feel like if you follow your passion. You always get a takeaway, and that was Gary Vee’s takeaway that I never paid attention to. I forgot. And with this podcast, I’m going to thank you right now, because that does remind me to do more story-related selling in my Bill is the lawman, not just my ULF Umansky Law Firm, and then keep the context of my stuff down. So I appreciate you for reminding me what’s important actually.

Erik J. Olson:

Something else, I used to binge on Gary Vee all the time and backed off over time. But one of the things that I also picked up from him, I give him full credit is a document versus create. So as an example, the reel that I shared, it’s you cooking. I’m guessing that you didn’t make that soup just for the content. You were making it anyways, right? You needed to eat. You like to cook, it seems like. And so you made content in the moment. Is that correct?

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. And that’s one of the things that we’ve been trying to do is find a videographer to start going live, to start doing a lot more authentic stuff in the moment, and hiring a full-time videographer that gets you, understands that, then shoot video. So yeah, I didn’t do the soup for the reel. I mean, it was an afterthought, and it is what it is.

Erik J. Olson:

But a lot of people think, “I’ve got to make time for this.” And in some cases, yeah, you have to put some mental energy into it, but you can document what you do day in and day out. And look, people think that the life of a lawyer is pretty cool. I mean, there’s movies, TV shows about it, right? And so just if you’re a trial lawyer going into a courtroom, people don’t see that a lot, and they may find it interesting. So there’s opportunity. Hey, I want to respect your time. We’re way over. But I don’t even think I’ve asked one of the questions that we normally ask because we’ve just been going back and forth, which is great. It’s the way I prefer. But I do want to ask one question about is there something in your marketing that hasn’t worked recently like it used to before?

Bill Umansky:

I mean, we talked off air. I mean, right now, I mean, I’ve been doing this for X amount of years, and I told you that I had gone … actually, I now remember the name, StomperNet. It was a seminar on how to create your own internet company, digital marketing company. And I think currently you’re getting me in a phase where Google just released an algorithm, I don’t know, this podcast could be released out beyond it, and it’s a huge change. So we’re just going through that moment now, where we’re going to have to adjust, retool and get out of it. How long it’s going to take, I don’t know. Sometimes it’s taken as little as two weeks. Sometimes quite frankly it’s taken two, three months. So that’s just based on that. Now, if you’re asking me about another marketing tool that used to work, that didn’t work, old school used to be direct mail and snail mail. That stuff obviously is years past, doesn’t work as much anymore.

Bill Umansky:

And so, no, I mean, pretty much everything I do is it works. I don’t know how to explain that to you, but evolving towards your market is important. I would tell you, I was starting to get on Clubhouse, and I got off real quick because I didn’t see the return on that. But I do grassroots stuff. So foundation, I have a charity called the Second Chance Foundation. I’m in private clubs, like the University Club, which has a good group of people that support each other. I’m in Rotary. I used to be involved in a lot of legal organizations. I backed out of that to start doing more work on my own foundation. All of it works. I mean, gratitude giving. There’s books on how to give gifts to lawyers.

Bill Umansky:

I give your managing partners or the people that are listening to this podcast, you don’t have to spend a lot of money. I want to give you an example. I know I’m digressing, but I had a buddy of mine who’s a doctor go through kidney stones. And with this Google algorithm update, our caseload has dropped significantly in the last two or three weeks, and so I’m tight on marketing and budgeting. So we tasked our director of PI marketing, how do we find a gift for this person who’s Mormon, who also went through these stones, which is painful.

Bill Umansky:

And so this person refers me a lot of work. We found $20 pair of cuff links that have stones on them, kidney stones, right? That guy’s going to love that. And we’re going to give it to him. He’s going to wear it with a badge of honor. And so, when people give you gifts, when people give you referrals, a thank you note, a thank you card is not good enough, or even a gift is not good enough. You have to make it an experience, something that relates to them emotionally, and that stuff never goes out of style. So no, I think everything is working actually, other than right now, the current scene of SEO.

Erik J. Olson:

Yeah. I mean, I’m a huge believer in SEO. It works. But yeah, there are ups and downs, and someone has to be paying attention to those things. So when there’s a dip, something has to happen for you to work your way out of it. It sounds like you guys are doing that. But hey, this isn’t the first big update. It won’t be the last. They seem to be coming every month or two these days, the big changes. So if people aren’t focused on playing the Google game, you’re not going to get discovered. It’s very difficult to get discovered these days if you don’t play ball with Google.

Erik J. Olson:

And as much as any of us don’t like to have to deal with the overlord of the internet, they call the shots. And so you either figure out what to do, and they publish all these best practices. They tell you exactly what to do. It’s my opinion that they put that out there, and they may tell you for months or really years, “These are our best practices. Thou shalt do this. These are our recommendations.” And then they figure out eventually how to enforce it. And that’s where these algorithm changes come out. And the people that ignored it or went black hat, and I’m not saying that’s you, but they could pay the price. So pay attention.

Bill Umansky:

Yeah, and I think they’re also pushing a local bent. So opening offices, you know this from doing digital marketing, how many times over the years of like, “Oh, let’s open an office, let’s open multiple offices.” Oh, then that wasn’t good. Then Google messed with you with that. You could even follow what they’re asking, and they were changing on you day to day. It’s like their local service ad. When they came out, it was a nightmare. Then it worked for some people, it didn’t work or for others, I think Google is still trying to figure out what Google wants them to do. And they’re all about the bottom line, right? It’s the driver. So whatever makes Google money is what Google’s going to figure out.

Bill Umansky:

And I always worry as a digital marketer, when are they going to get rid of organic? Because they always put that squeeze on it. But then they make money off of digital marketers too. So they’re like digital marketers are the ones like you just said, “Thou shalt not Google.” So Google is it. And as a digital marketer, you make your trade off Google. So there’s smart people over there, right? And we’ll never outthink them. It’s just a matter of trying to work through what their processes are. As you indicated, they put their stuff out there for people to see, and then they figure out how to enforce it later on.

Erik J. Olson:

Well, cool, Bill. Hey, man, I’ve really appreciated your time. If someone would like to reach out, find out more about you, have a question, what’s the best way to get in touch with you?

Bill Umansky:

Yeah. Bill is the lawman on Instagram is probably the best way. Just send me a DM, and I’ll be glad to talk to you about all kinds of marketing stuff or just practice of law stuff or the EOS system that you showed the book because I’m a big … I’m in the middle of that right now, and there’s been some great things. We’ve also had some turnover, and if we didn’t have EOS, we would be FK-ed. So we’re doing pretty well with that. And EOS has been a game changer. So they can reach out to me on Instagram is the best we to reach me. I do respond to my DMs.

Erik J. Olson:

Cool. All right, everybody. Reach out to Bill. I follow him. I’ve been following him for a couple weeks. He’s got some really cool content. I just shared your reel today, where you were in the sauna. Was that on, by the way? You were in the sauna with the sweater on.

Bill Umansky:

No, no, no, no, no, no, no. I wanted to turn it on. And I just got that sauna. It’s been a life game changer for me. But yeah. But thank you.

Erik J. Olson:

Awesome. All right. Bill is the lawman on Instagram. If you want to check out other episodes like this, our full backlog is at arraylaw.com/podcast. Each podcast episode is tagged by the practice area and state, so you can find exactly what you’re looking for. And if you’re looking for digital marketing for your law firm, check out my company, Array Digital at arraylaw.com. We’re a digital marketing agency that focuses on law firms. We provide services such as website development and support, SEO, online advertising and social media. All right, Bill. Thanks so much.

Bill Umansky:

You’re welcome, dude. See you later.

 

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Website Design, Online Advertising, SEO, Social Media & Digital Marketing.
© Array Law