THE

Managing
Partners
podcast

Episode # 189
Interview on 05.10.2022

Hosted By
Kevin Daisey

Featuring Attorney

Jobeth Bowers



Managing Partner of
Bowers Hassan & Herndon

About Jobeth Bowers

Jobeth Bowers is the Managing Partner at Bowers Law Firm in Maryland.

Jobeth is active within the Cecil County Community, and a member of the Elkton BNI Chapter. He has handled personal injury claims for nearly a decade and has been handling criminal matters in court since he was in law school. He has received the prestigious honor of being named ‘Super Lawyer’ in each year that he has been admitted to practice, an honor only bestowed upon the top 2.5% of Maryland Lawyers.

Learn from his expertise and what trends are helping grow his firm on this episode of The Managing Partners Podcast!

Watch the Episode

Episode Transcript

Kevin Daisey:

All right. Welcome everybody to another live recording of the Managing Partners Podcast. My name’s Kevin Daisey, and I’ll be your host. Also the founder of Array Digital. We help law firms with their digital marketing, help them get more leads, more phone calls. That’s what we do. Today I got a special guest, not too far from me here in Maryland, Jobeth Bowers. Welcome to the show.

Jobeth Bowers:

Kevin. Thanks for having me. How are you?

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah, absolutely. So Jobeth is actually a fellow podcaster. He has a podcast himself talking about, I guess, personal injury and things like that in his state of Maryland. So be sure to check that out and you’re going to learn more about Jobeth as we’re talking on the show. If you’re tuning in on YouTube or live in the future here, you can go to bowerslawmd.com. So bowerslawmd.com. If you’re listening, go check that out. See what he is all about. The podcast is actually linked off there. You can see the audio clips, and then he’s also got like a video version too.

Kevin Daisey:

So I wish I thought was really cool. So I went and checked that out. I always love when I see someone producing some content and getting in front of a camera and answering problems or questions that clients have. So I think it’s a good way to get content out there. So Jobeth, I guess, tell us your story. What’s up? How’d you become an attorney? Why? And then we’ll get more into about your actual firm and your practice areas.

Jobeth Bowers:

Well, I mean, it was not the traditional journey. I did not have parents that were attorneys or anything like that. I went to undergrad, ended up working actually in a sales gig that took me from Maryland to Chicago. I had started in Maryland with a company doing sales, developing business campaigns, sales campaigns for business clients. And then we moved to Chicago, expanded an office. And after a couple years, it was all day, every day around the clock. And I decided, hey, it’s time to go back home, get into something that I really want to do, which I’ve always had an interest in the law.

Jobeth Bowers:

So I actually started working for a law firm back here in Maryland, ended up, that was a small one attorney firm, moved to a larger firm and then was recruited by a solo attorney at the time who was starting his own practice saying, “Hey, come build my infrastructure, help me build my firm.” So we built a pretty robust personal injury firm at the time. And it was around that time that basically I had met my ceiling as far as earning was concerned as a non-attorney. So next step was law school. And I will tell you that was obviously a non-traditional path.

Jobeth Bowers:

A lot of people know they’re going to do it. They go to undergrad. Then they go to law school, then they clerk somewhere so on and so forth. But I will tell you that journey probably helped me hit the ground running far more than any of the traditional paths that I could have taken because I came out of law school, having built a firm, knew a lot of the things to do, not to do. I mean, I’ll tell you one of the more valuable things in building a firm isn’t knowing what to do, but knowing what to avoid.

Jobeth Bowers:

And then just in general, having that sales background is, I mean, it becomes an inherent part of conversations with clients, conversations with opposing counsel, conversations with insurance adjusters that just you’re you’re selling. And you don’t even realize that you’re selling because you’ve been doing it for so long. So all of those things have kind of helped build a fairly solid foundation for what was a solo/small firm for a while. It’s still relatively small, but a little over a year ago, I expanded to take on two partners that are really partners in separate practice areas to build out kind of the base of the firm and what we can offer to largely a preexisting client base, and always growing client base.

Kevin Daisey:

No, I think that’s actually awesome because, well, for when you took a different path completely, but to end up where you are, but how cool would it be if you’re like, “I want to be an attorney.” Okay, first go to business school, then go get sales training, and then run a business and then start go to law school. But that makes sense that would help you a lot. And the thing is, it doesn’t have mean you have to be like some massive firm, like a Morgan and Morgan, because you have those things, but I assume you run a tight ship. You know how to run it. So whether you scale it or not doesn’t necessarily matter. So I think that’s pretty awesome that you had that experience before, taking the leap to go to law school.

Jobeth Bowers:

Yeah. I mean, there’s certainly a set of systems and procedures are in place that would allow for the scaling, which I would say that to a small extent is being done with this expansion. It’s a little different because we’re adding more in the base than it is a scale of doing exactly what we’ve been doing.

Kevin Daisey:

Got you.

Jobeth Bowers:

It becomes a point and you’ve seen it with some of these large, “National firms,” the best way that they scale is to go through and acquire other existing firms and then put in place their systems, because it’s just it’s so difficult to find and train from day one, the people to fill your organization do the things that you want them to do, the way that you want them to do. I can tell you that in the eight years of running this firm in whatever iteration it is, that my highest turnover in staff has been from people who have had years of experience versus those who have come in from no info, no understanding of what’s going on here and learning everything from the ground up because those people, once they get it and understand it, they only know your system.

Jobeth Bowers:

So as long as your system works, those people don’t know any different versus people who have been doing the same type of work in a totally different system for 10, 20, 30 years, that adjustment can be rigorous and challenging. And it doesn’t always suit people that have been doing, they’re setting their ways. They’ve been doing things away for however long they’ve been doing it and-

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah, no one likes change.

Jobeth Bowers:

Retraining is difficult for many.

Kevin Daisey:

No. Yeah. A lot of people don’t like change. They have their ways that they did it. They want to bring that with them. And I think some, right now we’ve been going through some employee is kind of a upgrading if you will and transition. And in some cases we need to bring in those folks that have experience to bring them in, at a higher level and say, “Hey, we don’t have the capability to do this or fix this. And my team hasn’t have that capability either, because they’ve only been here and they don’t know what they don’t know, but we’ve always, we’ve been very successful at bringing people in, at a low level and training and they learned the way we want to do it versus we’ve had a lot of problems too, bringing in people in the past where they have their own way of doing it and it’s not really what we want them to do.

Kevin Daisey:

So yeah, totally agree with that. Yeah. And these big national firms, they’re, they’re doing all that stuff. They’re, they’re buying up firms left and right. And just plugging them into their system and they probably lose a lot of those folks all along the way, but they take the clients, they keep some of the A players and wrench and repeat. Yeah. So tell us a little bit about what your real focus is. So personal injury, it looks like you focus on a couple different practice series, but what is your hot spot? What’s your real niche and where do you guys focus at?

Jobeth Bowers:

So for me personally, the bulk of the practice is not just personal injury, but specifically automobile accidents. That is what, since the day one I’ve been doing, that’s kind of the foundation of the firm. The expansion over the past year has included bringing in a partner who prior to joining us was pretty much our exclusive referral partner for our work injury cases. So he handled all of our worker’s comp cases.

Kevin Daisey:

Got it.

Jobeth Bowers:

And it was a logical transition over a six or seven year relationship to say, “Hey, this is all working out. I’m referring you to these cases on a very regular basis. I’m not getting the complaints that the clients I’m referring you are not calling me wanting to know what’s going on. You’re handling everything.” Which it’s seems like an odd concept, but what I have learned over the years that customer service, that client relationship element is not a primary focus of all firms, but I feel like it has been the foundation that has built my firm above any other piece.

Jobeth Bowers:

If I were going to take one thing that I would say that, “Hey, I did this right.” This is the one thing that you need to do starting fresh and starting from scratch. That’s kind of the thing focus on that service and the clients, the rest of it’ll eventually figure itself out or you’ll piece it together. So my primary office and where I opened up when I first opened my own office is in a rural corner of Maryland. So the hotspot where all the volume is, is about an hour from me in Baltimore area and then another 45 minutes to an hour in the DC suburbs.

Kevin Daisey:

Okay. Yeah.

Jobeth Bowers:

And I largely stayed out of that game and built my foundation here where I am. And I knew, even though I had learned this business in the city, I cut my teeth there. I’ve always had this drive to go back there and expand into there. And in years of hiring associates and having them working out of an office that I had down there, it never really got that traction that I needed it to have to really blow it up and expand it. And I learned pretty quickly that part of that was from these people not having the same skin in the game as somebody who had ownership over it. So I knew that at some point in time, if I wanted to expand into that, there were two ways I needed to, I was going to go. I was either going to continue to build where I am now and just build up those walls and be kind of continuing to be more strongly the go-to guy in this niche, in this area, or I’d have to take somebody on that at least had some sort of partnership interest in it.

Jobeth Bowers:

So the worker’s comp element of it that worked itself out through that relationship. And it just years I have quietly and without anybody knowing been picking off like-minded people or people that I thought would be, hey, this might be somebody to have the conversation with one day, this might be a firm worth approaching to matters this, that and the other, and referring out business to various places. It just sitting back and watching what happens with it. When you have a good referral relationship, you take that for granted that they’re all going to be like that. And it just left and right. I’ve got people calling me six months after referring a case out, not even knowing who the attorney that’s representing them is. I’ve got attorneys that we’ve sent cases to that-

Kevin Daisey:

Oh, wow.

Jobeth Bowers:

… you have to have resolved and you never get any sort of fee split check. So you know that they’re burning you on fees and it’s just a list of people that are potential candidates to merge with. And you’re off the list and you’re off the list and you’re off the list and you’re scrambling and doing everything that you can to get an update, to make sure that you know that the case is at least being handled correctly, burn me on my fee that’s fine. Just don’t burn the client please.

Jobeth Bowers:

So that’s been a journey, that’s been a difficulty in finding the right person that would come in and expand largely that element of it. So we’ve expanded into that Baltimore market handling the attorney that handles our and leads all of our workers comp is out of there. As well as an attorney that handles our criminal and family law, all of our auto work is still basically under my umbrella as of right now. I’ve got an associate that handles all of our trial work or the vast majority of our trial work, but that’s kind of where we are there, but as we mentioned before, it’s a challenge and I mean, if it were easy, everybody be doing it, right?

Kevin Daisey:

That’s right. Well, you got your own way of going about it and your own way of doing it. And you’re not just wanting to work with anybody and just send stuff to people that aren’t going to do a good job. So I think that’s good. You’re figuring it out. And you’re figuring what’s best for you and your firm. And one of the things I think you said was huge is communication. And especially with the clients or referral sources or whoever it is. But I think a lot of firms fall short on the client communication and in my industry, we’re in digital marketing agencies and stuff like that.

Kevin Daisey:

I mean, they’re notoriously bad for it, but I think that’s a huge part or huge piece that can be make you stand out for sure is that the client knows what’s happening. They’re well informed. They don’t have to call you first. You make sure they know exactly what, and then they stop calling you because they’re like, “Hey,” they got it. I’m not worried. They keep updating me. And then you don’t have a bunch of clients bugging the crap out of you. But I see a lot of firms that fall short on that.

Jobeth Bowers:

No, I mean, I’ve heard stories and I’ve talked to people that in other markets that they’re like, we don’t take inbound calls from our clients. We do the work and it is what it is. And I’m like, how do you last?

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah, that’s crazy.

Jobeth Bowers:

How are you not the scourge of the client base, over the past couple of years, especially with the pandemic and everything we’ve implemented additional strategies in which to even improve what I think is a far above average experience for our clients. I mean, we’ve implemented a text line that clients can text back and forth with attorneys, staff-

Kevin Daisey:

Awesome.

Jobeth Bowers:

… that integrates with our case management software, so that there’s constantly a record of those communications attached to the file. There’s never a question about a conversation that’s happened. It gives clients the ability to send us documents, photos, have those all automatically attached to their matters. So it’s made the communication easier on our clients, the ability for them to get information. You mentioned the podcast. The podcast is like the marketing element of the podcast is really secondary to the information that it’s designed to provide to our existing client base.

Jobeth Bowers:

Our existing client base oftentimes will have questions that, so do most of the other clients and the ability to preemptively say, “Hey, this is what’s going on. This is what’s next. And here’s some information on it.” Like you mentioned, they’ve got the information, it cuts down, or it doesn’t completely eliminate, but it cuts down on the need for a lot of those phone calls of, “Hey, what’s going to happen next.” Well, before you’ve asked, I’ve already, I spent the time one time to explain that leg of the process you’ve been sent it, you’ve watched it on your own time.

Jobeth Bowers:

If you’ve forgotten part of it, you’re not calling me back. You’re going back to the link. You’re watching the video again and saying, “Oh yeah, yeah, yeah, that’s what’s happening next.” And then it really, you’re spending more… The client time that you’re spending interacting directly with the client is, it becomes very specific to the case, very specific to the client. And it’s even more fulfilling. It’s a quantity versus quality thing. You’re definitely spending less time on the phone with clients for the quality of, and the value of that time that you’re spending with them is a lot higher.

Kevin Daisey:

Well, that’s the thing you don’t want to spend an hour and then half of the explaining next steps and things you need and all that stuff, when you can get that out of the way and spend more time on the real things that matter. And then I think it also shows when you do that stuff, you’re willing to answer questions that clients have or potential clients have before they even call you. And so it is good that when you can do that, “Hey, we’re answer your question. We’ll put it out there to the world. We’re not scared to tell people our competitors or whatever.” You’ll put out there the answers and you’re cool to do that. But it shows that you’re willing to share information, you’re accessible.

Kevin Daisey:

And I think the other thing too, is on a marketing kind of side, is they get to know you and feel comfortable with you and see you on video or listen to you. And that just, I think, puts people at ease versus if I go to your website and I don’t see a picture of you, no video of you, I don’t know who you are, and I’m just going to call because you say you do personal injury, right? So I think a podcast or videos like that accomplished a lot of things so. Oh, you got a question on that? Here, I answered that question and-

Jobeth Bowers:

Exactly. You start to establish that relationship. If I don’t know if there are recreational podcast, I guess I’ll use that term for it that you listen to on a regular basis. But if you do over time, there’s kind of this one way street where you feel like you know those podcasters. But they have no idea who you are, but you have started to learn things about their lives and what’s going on there and you feel like you know them and the ability to start to preemptively build that relationship for a prospective client, for an existing client, whatever it may be. It’s really got value there that’s difficult to measure.

Kevin Daisey:

No, a hundred percent. And I’ve been doing, I got a personal podcast that’s like every day. And then I do this podcast where I get meet people like yourself and learn about your firm and how you’re running a business. And I’m an entrepreneur and you are too. And so I like to talk about any kind of business, no matter what it is, but I’ve gotten clients. I got one recently where this goes like on LinkedIn and I put stuff all over social media. And I’ve been listening to, I feel like I know you, even though you don’t know me, so don’t be freaked out, but I’ve been watching you, your videos and stuff for like a year, been wanting to hire you guys for a long time. And today is the day. And they were already sold, like done just now as to figure out what they want to do.

Kevin Daisey:

But it’s kind of crazy and cool at the same time when that happens. And that can ask that any attorneys listening, I’ve had a bunch of people on here talking about podcasts, but that’s just one piece, but there’s podcasts. You can have a TikTok, you can have videos, you can do all kinds of stuff, but it puts yourself out there and people say, “Okay, I can connect with this guy. I understand what he’s doing. He’s helping me with free information.” And when it comes to time, maybe not in personal injury as much, it’s a little bit more of probably a smaller window of time between, when they choose somebody, but you want to get your name out there. And you want people to refer to you as like, “Oh, I watched this one guy. I had a case one time, I’ll listen to this one guy. He tells me all about the next steps and things I need to do. You should give him a call.” And they might not even know who you are, right? So tons of benefits to it.

Jobeth Bowers:

Yeah. Without a doubt. I mean, you’re spreading a net. The question is how wide of a net that you want to spread and building up the resources on the back end, so that as you said, people start referring you things that you may not even do. And one of the big things that is important to me is staying in my lane. So finding those referral partners to be able to facilitate sending out this, that, or the other, or eventually you start getting an influx of a certain type of case kind of like what happened with the expansion in the workers’ comp. I mean, there was a volume of workers’ comp that was coming through.

Jobeth Bowers:

And when you know that your percentage of a fee for these cases that you’re sending out to somebody else has eclipsed six figures. Okay, now maybe it’s time to keep that in house and make these moves. And the same way that happened here with the worker’s comp, if we start an influx of a certain case type, and whether it be that person that we’re referring it out to, or otherwise that the next move is already determined itself to some extent.

Kevin Daisey:

No, that’s really cool. I had a thought, this is a random thought, but it was based on, there’s another attorney I had on here with me a couple weeks back, and he had not a podcast, but they kind of have like a group. So in his line of work, he’s got multiple resources and private investigators, or all kinds of other resources that he pulls on for a case. And so what he had done, he was put together like some kind of like video series, but he would interview these different folks about things, about what they have to do. And what’s the process like for what they have to do in order for the case.

Kevin Daisey:

And so it was kind of cool, but if you had a podcast where you’re brail to bring in other folks that and they could become referral partners basically, but there’s all kinds of things you could think of and to do to help each other. And maybe it’s different attorneys talking about different things as a group, but there’s just a lot of different opportunities out there. And I think some people they’re too busy to kind of think out of the box and get out of their own way sometimes.

Jobeth Bowers:

Well, I’m a part of some networking groups that are not necessarily all within line with what I do, but there’s-

Kevin Daisey:

BNI? I saw you’re part of BNI.

Jobeth Bowers:

Yeah. So there’s a defense-

Kevin Daisey:

I investigated you.

Jobeth Bowers:

What’s that?

Kevin Daisey:

I said, I saw that you were part of BNI. So I was going to throw that out there.

Jobeth Bowers:

Yeah. So that’s a group. I mean, we are in a chapter that there’s almost, we teeter back and forth and the high thirties to 40 members. And I mean, we do 12 to 14 million dollars in business as a chapter, at least that gets reported every year. Like with anything, there are a chunk of people in that group that get it, there’s a chunk of people that are in that group that are trying to figure it out, a chunk of people and I’m sure this is the same for every chapter that are there every morning with their hand out and don’t understand kind of the big picture of it.

Jobeth Bowers:

But locking down and focusing on, especially if they’re connected to your practice area. But even if they’re not, the ability for you to build and help build somebody else’s business and their sphere of influence, what that pays back in is a huge multiplier. If I’m working on helping a new physical therapy practice, that’s in another part of the county, build their client base that I’m going to be their go to guy when they have unrepresented people hobbling the door at their accident or working-

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah. What happened to you?

Jobeth Bowers:

One or two things now that may not directly impact me and down the line, the floodgate’s open. I mean, I’ve helped one of my… I mean, should I be putting all the trade secrets out here? I don’t know, but one of the things that I love doing is helping property and casualty insurance agents build their agencies through referrals. I mean, this won’t be a secret by looking at the content that I’ve created, both on my website, social media, the YouTube channel or anything, but in above average level of focus, put on educating my clients and the general public on what’s inside their auto insurance policy. What’s not apparent necessarily from all of the marketing stuff, because I’m not a licensed insurance agent.

Jobeth Bowers:

Is that next step of, okay, this is what’s wrong with what you have. Here are some people that can help you out. That’s all part of building a long term pipeline of, I don’t want to say people who owe me favors, but it is what it is. It’s people who will, as they have their clients that get in losses and need help with the third party element of claims, who else would they call, but somebody that’s helped build what they have. And that’s been a long tenured practice that I’ve had within my office for decades before I was even an attorney, it was something that I was doing.

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah. So that’s how I started my business completely. And BNI exactly BNI was something that I was part of early on. I’m not part of it now, but we have a lot of chapters here locally, but that helped me get off the ground. And that spiraled into meeting lots of folks that I still refer business with, my financial planner for my whole company, for my employees and my business stuff came from that. But we just, I moved into kind of different groups outside of BNI, but that’s what got me started. And I was in that group for quite a long time.

Kevin Daisey:

And yeah, it takes years. You don’t just show up and say, “Okay, where’s my referrals.” You have to give back, you have to refer others, you have to do good work or you won’t get referred. And I think some people are just like, “I don’t want to put all the energy into this, but if you dig in and get a group like that, especially a local group, if you’re a local type business, you have to do that to me. And I think a lot of attorneys probably you look at these other kinds of groups, like a BNI versus just the bar or like attorney only stuff where they put most of their time and energy. So yeah good stuff.

Jobeth Bowers:

For sure. Yeah. And like I said, the two fold of it is number one, a lot of people want to have that arsenal of resources. So proving that you’re part of that is part of the success there, but also in helping other people build, whether you stay in that chapter or not, I’m sure that there are relationships that you developed when you were in a chapter that still have some touches from time to time.

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah, no, a hundred percent. It’s kind of funny because every once in a while, I haven’t been, it’s probably been 10, 15 years since I was part of that chapter and I get invited back every once in a while to stand in for someone. And I know half the room, I’m just not part of it because it doesn’t really fit with where I am and where my time is, but powerful groups, powerful groups, and some are insanely powerful and structured, and you’ll visit like a different chapter and be like, “Okay, they don’t get it.”

Kevin Daisey:

And then sometimes there’s one that’s even better than what you have going on. And then you get these little power groups within there. So for you, the physical therapist is a good power group member, right? So the ones that can refer each other all the time, like the mortgage person and the real estate agent and the loan whatever, they all just crush it. And I’ve seen people go, “Man, how come they always refer each other, like tons of referrals.” And it’s because they work, of course-

Jobeth Bowers:

It’s the nature of that flow. I mean, if they’re going to contact me, they’re going to need this, this and this. That physical therapy guy, the body shop, the property casualty agent, it may start with one or the other and then work its way around that circle for the most part, it may not even need all of us every time but-

Kevin Daisey:

Hey, call this person, reach out. They might need your help. Doesn’t mean they do every time. So nothing, there’s also-

Jobeth Bowers:

They are the members of a group and certain mentalities that I look for when I’m scouting groups for other members of my firm to join without a doubt.

Kevin Daisey:

Absolutely. No, I love that. So I think a lot of attorneys go, “Well, we don’t market, we don’t advertise. We just work all referral.” Which is great that they have that base and they figured that out. But I feel like people don’t really, or most don’t really know or they don’t know how many they’re going to get. They don’t really have a system for it. They’ve just done good stuff. They know some people and they just get referrals. I think this way you can be way more intentional about it and make sure you’re giving referrals back and make sure you have a system. I have a whole list of companies that stuff we don’t do. And I have no allegiance to these folks. I just have made a list because it helps my client. And like, “Kevin…” Actually, I had a client reach out to me and they were like, they’re not personal injury, but they had been potentially have a claim for auto accident.

Kevin Daisey:

And they’re like, “Who can I call?” And I said, “Oh, I got the… Connect with this attorney.” And I lined them up and said, “Hey, they might have a case,” and blah, blah. But I have all shit of other people, accountants, business attorneys, you name it for anything a client might need. “Hey, Kevin, you know a good accountant, mine’s not doing what they’re supposed to be doing.” “Sure. Here’s mine. Or here’s a list of a few that I recommend.” That’s just helpful for everyone to have, people that you trust. And especially with BNI, you get like that whole catalog of thinkable. “Oh, who you need.” I got them right here.” And just shows that you’re helping and you’re a resource and I think that’s what we all should try to be for our clients.

Jobeth Bowers:

No doubt. No doubt.

Kevin Daisey:

Excellent. Well, anything else big? So with the podcast and marketing, what’s some of the things you got going on, anything big on the agenda for this year?

Jobeth Bowers:

Well, on top of everything else that I do, I’m an NFL agent and the draft is next week, at least from the time that we’re recording this. So that’s a big deal and-

Kevin Daisey:

Awesome.

Jobeth Bowers:

So yeah, we should have four new players entering the league from the collegiate ranks. So yeah, that’s an endeavor that I took on a handful of years and have been growing that on the side of the law practice, just another thing to keep us in the game.

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah. That’s awesome. I mean, you got to, life is not all work, right? And I think as business owners, I can talk about work all the time and I’m fine. I just like to talk about business all the time, but it’s good to have other things to do so.

Jobeth Bowers:

Yeah. Yeah. That’s awesome for sure. And it’s definitely something that’s not, I mean, it’s work, but it’s not… I don’t see it that way. It’s an opportunity to travel. It’s more networking. It’s a totally different situation than running a law practice for sure.

Kevin Daisey:

No, that sounds really cool actually. I had a guy, I know he as actually a marketing company here locally to us and he’s got to be 50, in his 50s, but he’s a soccer referee for legit soccer. And so he travels all around. He has a season. He runs his business and then he’s off traveling to be a ref in soccer games all around the world. Which I thought was pretty cool. And he has to pass some physical every year. He has to be in certain shape and I thought it was pretty awesome. I don’t have anything cool like that. I got kids. I’ll take them surfing and on the boat.

Jobeth Bowers:

There you go.

Kevin Daisey:

So well, cool. Jobeth, you have anything else you want to share before we roll?

Jobeth Bowers:

No, I mean that covers it. I appreciate you having me on.

Kevin Daisey:

Yeah, no, I love what you’re doing. I think big takeaways of communication, how important that is and freely sharing information, as long as it’s not something that’s proprietary or put your firm in a bad spot or competitors. But other than that, the answers are out there. They’re going to give the answers like provide the information, think about a podcast or video series or articles, blogs, whatever it might be and have a system for communicating with your clients.

Jobeth Bowers:

Yeah. For sure.

Kevin Daisey:

I think that’s just huge. And then referral partners. Again, this always have to be just attorneys, look outside the box, look at other groups, the chamber, whatever in your local area, that might make sense because if someone gets a car accident, that’s everyone, right? So that could be your neighbor, your brother, your… It doesn’t matter. People know people and they can send you a referral. So that’s awesome. If you want to check up Jobeth that’s bowerslawmd.com, you can connect to with him on there, all his information’s on there as well. Is there any other way people could reach out to you other attorneys that might be either asked questions or be a good referral source for you?

Jobeth Bowers:

I mean that all of our contact information is on the website there. Actually one of the project we didn’t really talk about, but one of the projects that I have that is in development is it’ll probably still be a few months until this launches is going to be an attorney only, mostly I think it’s going to be an audio podcast, what we’re working on right now, but it’s kind of, it’s really about the game theory of practicing law, how to learn the playbooks, manipulate the playbooks of other… It’s originally going to start and launch based on personal injury claims and handling these cases throughout the litigation process and the pre litigation process so-

Kevin Daisey:

Awesome.

Jobeth Bowers:

Anybody that has interest in being part of that or subscribing to that, it’s not live now, but within the next few months it will. So if you’re interested in something like that, feel free to shoot me a message through any of the contact info on my regular firm’s website. And we’ll keep you in the loop for when that launches.

Kevin Daisey:

That’s awesome. Yeah. I wish I knew more about that in the beginning of the show.

Jobeth Bowers:

Well, it’s still kind of like I said, it’s still kind of a behind the scenes and development thing. We’re looking to have probably a good three, four months worth of content ready and on deck before we even launch it.

Kevin Daisey:

Got it. That’s always good.

Jobeth Bowers:

We’re not quite there yet, but that’s coming, it’s in the pipeline.

Kevin Daisey:

That’s awesome. Yeah. I love that. So I think another thing too, is anyone listening and you’re trying to do a podcast or something like that talk to Jobeth or myself. I have a whole talk, I give on just how to start a podcast from the basics to beyond how to do it for marketing, prospecting, all kinds of stuff. But one of the things you just said is you’re going to have some content ready because the last thing you want to do is launch this big thing and then be like, “Oh, we only have one episode,” and then someone gets sick or something happens and now you have a dead show.

Jobeth Bowers:

Well, like you said, the majority of your audience are people who run firms so everybody out there goes into the day, goes into the week, goes into the month, whatever it is with a plan. And then you end up doing this. And some of that overlaps with the plan, but a whole lot of it ends up somewhere else and you’re in the weeds. And if you’re trying to stick to any sort of a content release schedule, whether it be-

Kevin Daisey:

Which is a good idea.

Jobeth Bowers:

Putting something on TikTok or a YouTube video or a podcast or whatever it might be insert content piece here. If you don’t have some backups and some bank episodes or whatever it is ready and teed up, it’s not a matter of if you get swept aside and distracted or something else, it’s just, it’s a matter of when. When is that going to happen? And when are you going to be in the weeds?

Kevin Daisey:

A hundred percent. A hundred percent.

Jobeth Bowers:

The secret to the podcast that we’re talking about is that I’m not doing those episodes. That’s all been recorded. I don’t even know the release schedule because somebody else is… I sat here for hours one weekend and blasted it all out. And now it’s being developed and put out and dropped in the mastermind sort of game theory, one is going to be a totally different animal. That is going to be one that I’m completely on the pulse of and developing and running. But it also has a… It’s going to be one of those types of, this is only for certain types of attorneys with certain mindsets and goals that handle plaintiff side of these things sort of-

Kevin Daisey:

Sure. Yeah.

Jobeth Bowers:

… sign this disclosure, we’re going to kick you out and whatever. So different animal there, but again-

Kevin Daisey:

Well, thanks for sharing that.

Jobeth Bowers:

[inaudible 00:40:56] in progress. We’ll probably, like I said, launch within the next few months.

Kevin Daisey:

Well, again, if you’re listening to this, it’s already out, but we’ll get this up as soon as we can. And the other thing too is, well, as I wrap up here, we have the Managing Partners newsletter, which we drop every week and we feature episodes like this. So a guest that come on the show. But we also feature things in there that are like books that our attorneys, our guests have written. We also feature podcasts that other attorneys or firms have, all the time.

Kevin Daisey:

So we can definitely get that inside our newsletter and get that out to everybody. And we have, again, like 1500 managing partners in that list. And top of that other lots of other attorneys, but happy to share that too. So remind me of that. We’ll talk here in a second backstage, but we can definitely push that out for you and connect people with that and feature that in one of our send outs.

Jobeth Bowers:

Sounds good.

Kevin Daisey:

Awesome. Well, thanks so much for sharing that and that’s really cool. I’m looking forward to seeing that come together and you’ll have to give me updated again, we can get into our cycle and share it. For this episode, if you’re already listened to it right now, then you got it. But this is every single podcast platform there is, also on YouTube, also on our website. So Jobeth will have a page on our website once we’re ready with this. And you’ll be able to sort by Maryland personal injury in this case. And you’ll be able to find him in that list, as well as all the episodes we probably, we have over 200 episodes from different practice areas, different states, and you can sort and find the episodes you want to find that way. And then we feature two per week in our newsletter.

Kevin Daisey:

And those go out on that kind of schedule, just like you’re talking about, Jobeth. You have to have a schedule. You have to be consistent. People are looking forward to it. And so you have to have a backlog like we do. And if you need help with any of this kind of stuff or marketing or just questions or what we’re talking about, podcasting, whatever, you don’t have to be a client, reach out but my site is arraylaw.com. We do digital marketing for law firms and talk about this kind of stuff. So if you need any kind of help, let me know, reach out, happy asking any questions you got. Jobeth, anything else?

Jobeth Bowers:

No, just, yeah, thanks again for having me. And I look forward to networking with anybody that seems to make sense to.

Kevin Daisey:

Absolutely. And I apologize, my camera’s a little blurry. It does it everyone. So I have the audio focus. But he looks good and clear, so we’re good. It’s all good. Jobeth, thanks so much, I’ll talk to you backstage. Everyone else, have a great day. Thanks for tuning in. And we’ll talk to you soon.

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