THE

Managing
Partners
podcast

Episode # 183
Interview on 04.19.2022

Hosted By
Kevin Daisey

Featuring Attorney

Eido Walny



Managing Partner of
Walny Legal Group

About Eido Walny

Eido M. Walny is the Managing Partner at Walny Legal Group in Wisconsin.

Eido is a noted national speaker, author, and commentator on issues effecting estate planning, charitable giving methods, and topical business issues.

In 2014, he was selected as one of five national “Advisors with Heart” by Trusts & Estates Magazine. He was recognized for his contributions to the legal professional as a 2013 “Leader in the Law” by the Wisconsin Law Journal, and named as a Fellow to the Wisconsin Law Foundation’s class of 2013. He has been recognized as a “Leading Lawyer” in the area of estate planning by M Magazine. In 2012, he was named a “Forty Under 40” honoree by the Milwaukee Business Journal, and a Financial Advisor magazine 2012 Private Wealth All-Star Team nominee. Each year between 2008 and 2017, Eido has been named a Wisconsin Rising Star in Milwaukee Magazine, a recognition granted to fewer than 2.5% of attorneys in the state. He was also named a Five Star: Best in Client Satisfaction Wealth Manager each year since 2009 by Milwaukee Magazine. In addition, he was a 2019 “Best Places to Work” honoree from the Milwaukee Business Journal. In 2021, Eido was named to the US News and and World Report list of Best Lawyers in America. He serves on the national Board of Directors of the National Association of Estate Planners and Counsels.

Learn from his expertise and what trends are helping grow his firm on this episode of The Managing Partners Podcast!

Watch the Episode

Episode Transcript

Kevin Daisey:
All right, everyone. We are live and welcome to another live recording of the managing partners podcast. I’m Kevin Daisy, your host also the founder of Array Digital, where we help law firms grow through Digital Marketing. Today, I got a special guest out of Milwaukee. Edo Walny, welcome to the show.

Eido Walny:
Thanks for having me, Kevin. I’m excited to be here.

Kevin Daisey:
Yes, sir.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah, excited to learn more about your story. We got to chat a little bit backstage, so I got to hear a little bit about what you’re doing. Sounds really awesome and just excited to have you share your story and knowledge with the audience here. Again, anyone tuning in? If you’re a young attorney or a managing partner for many years, we hope that the show brings some value. So listen to these episodes, get some value out of it. Also connect with our guests, connect with our other attorneys here. Edo has a lot of resources, a lot of experience could be a good referral source for you so, I’ll be sure to share his contact information and website here shortly, but please reach out to each other and we’re just here to help.

Kevin Daisey:
Edo, tell us what was the light bulb moment? What made you become an attorney and got you in the path of where you are today?

Eido Walny:
When I was growing up, I had a couple attorneys in the family and one of the benefits that I had was spending some summers with them and tagging along and being able to see the things that they did. Most of the attorneys in my family were litigators and one of the things I quickly decided was that I liked what they were doing, but I hated litigation, didn’t want to have anything to do with that. That was not my cup of tea, but some sometimes in life, knowing what you don’t want is as valuable as knowing what you do want. I did like helping the clients and meeting with clients and getting involved with the law, as an area that was of interest to me so that helped give me some direction.

Eido Walny:
Later in my education, probably around high school, my father was buying a business and I saw the turmoil that caused within our family, where, the attorneys helping him were not as communicative as he would’ve wanted. They didn’t involve my mom, there was a lot of information and money being bounced around. My mom felt out of the loop and she was being ignored. She may not have been the person actually buying the business, but her inputs and her point of view and her feelings were still really important. The lack of involvement that she experienced caused a lot of friction within our family and I said, “listen, if I eventually do this, this is one of the things I don’t want to have it happen. I like the ability to help families, I don’t like how certain members of the family were treated. I’m going to do this better when I have the opportunity”.

Eido Walny:
Through law school, I learned about estate planning and was fortunate enough to get recruited by an estate planning attorney here in Milwaukee. I grew up in Chicago, so relatively close to home, but not at home and 20 years later, here I am.

Kevin Daisey:
Awesome, I love it. Thinking back when I was that age, just having any direction of where you want to go, I think is pretty difficult for a younger person. That’s huge if you have some direction, at least if you have this experience that puts you on the right path. So that’s great, that you were able to have those experiences to put you on the right path. I think the other thing too, I do Digital Marketing so I deal with attorneys and I think one of the important things you said there too, and this is with any business, any service business, where you’re providing a professional service and is that you always got to think about, who else is involved, who else is impacted? Is there any other influencers?

Kevin Daisey:
In this case, your mom wasn’t involved because whatever reason they didn’t ask, or they just didn’t care or whatever and I think that’s important, especially in my business too, making sure that you ask those questions, “Hey, is anyone else involved?” Anyone else can be impacted. Is there anyone that, for me, a sale will be killed if I don’t know that this other person’s involved. Right? We didn’t find that out and someone that especially had a stake in that. Right? Yeah, I think it’s great to ask those questions. Who else is involved? Who else can we help? Who else is this impact?

Eido Walny:
And read the room. I mean, when we meet with clients, well, sometimes we’re talking about pretty heavy topics and you will ask, “Does this make sense? Do you understand?” and you get the obligatory head Bob, but you have to be able to read the faces and read the eyes and if your sense is that they’re saying yes, because they feel like you are expecting a yes or they don’t want to embarrass themselves and say that they don’t understand, it’s on you as the lawyer, not to charge ahead. You really have to read the room.

Eido Walny:
If we’re dealing with a couple both spouses, because it’s really important for both of them to understand, they’re not just signing a bunch of paper, they’re getting involved with a plan and if they don’t understand it, all you’ve done is created a bunch of paper for them. I’ve seen numerous clients come in with documents prepared elsewhere and I ask them, “What have you done? What does the paper say?” and they’ll say, “I don’t know, the attorney prepared it. He said, sign it, we signed it and we wanted to just get out”. To me, that’s an abject failure that means somebody didn’t do their job and I don’t want to have that result with my clients.

Kevin Daisey:
That’s a good point. So, they just signed it because they’re like, “I don’t understand it. I’m not comfortable. I’m just going to sign it and be done.”

Eido Walny:
Lawyer said it was okay.

Kevin Daisey:
Check the box. Yeah, I think that’s great. That’s a great way to handle that and say, “Hey, well, let’s back up again and make sure you understand this” until they actually say, “Okay, I get it. I understand this.” “Do you got any questions? Are you comfortable with this?” Yeah, that’s great.

Kevin Daisey:
Tell me a little bit more about the firm itself, the makeup of the firm so, you handle a few different practice areas. You got some uniqueness about what you do with the estate planning, and you mentioned that to me in the beginning, but what are the kind of different kinds of clients that you really work with and focus on?

Eido Walny:
We’re a boutique estate planning practice, which makes us a little bit unique. Usually the kind of estate planning that we do is part of a department within a big firm, but I grew up in big firms and so what I did after spending 10 years at those shops was to say, I think we could do this better if it was a standalone practice. So the goal of the firm is to really take a big firm’s estate planning group, pluck it out of the big firm, which means that we can shed the politics, the business model, the entire approach to lawyering and client relations and really contour that to what I think is appropriate for this kind of practice. We are a very high level estate planning boutique shop, where we deal with everything from mom and pop planning to administration, to high-end asset protection and tax managements, elder law, which a lot of firms ignore, but is incredibly important.

Eido Walny:
From my perspective, the public views that as still estate planning, even though on the other side of the table, lawyers see that as a different practice area, to me, we’re catering to the public and if they see it as estate planning, then estate planning it is, and that’s what we do and that’s all we do. It’s nice because regardless of the economy and regardless of COVID or other outside factors, it’s a very steady practice. As long as people are getting married, getting divorced, dying, having health issues, it’s a steady practice. Congress does us a lot of favors by changing the tax code all the time or threatening to, so business is always good.

Kevin Daisey:
That raises questions, right? then they come to you.

Eido Walny:
Absolutely.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah, all of our clients that are in estate planning and divorce, it’s all been growth across the board, from what I can tell, which is good in that case, COVID bad growth, good. I like one of the things you said there was, and this is on the website. So if everyone’s turning in, check out the website, it’s walnylegal.com for anyone listening on audio, if not, it’s on the bottom of your screen, but check that out. One of the things it says right on the top of the website, is lowering the way it should be and you mentioned something similar to that just a second ago, and yeah, it is hard to do that. At a bigger firm, or again, I use myself as an example. We used to be a general agency marketing for everybody, for anything and you can’t really be the best at it, if you do that, you can’t really get good unless you really focus. A lot of these large firms, they have 20, 30 practice areas and they cover every little thing but they’re not really specialized in anything.

Eido Walny:
Absolutely. So lawyering the way it should be, has been the firm motto literally since day one, when we opened the firm. I wanted a mission statements and right before I opened the firm, that is what we came up with and here we are, a little over 10 years later, we’re still really proud of that. It has multiple meanings, lawyering the way it should be, not only it’s a statement to clients, but also a statement to staff and to lawyers in-house. I’ve been to places where coming to work every day was not necessarily all that fun and that’s not how it should be, life shouldn’t be like that, life as we’ve all experienced through COVID, life can be way too short and if you don’t enjoy coming to work and seeing your coworkers and seeing your clients, and if you don’t get excited when the phone rings, something’s not right.

Eido Walny:
I’m really happy that over the last 10 years, I have really looked forward to seeing all of my coworkers every day. I get excited when the phone rings and one comment I’m really proud of, when clients come in, is they say that they feel a different kind of vibe in our office when they’re here, as opposed to at other law firms and that’s what we strive for. If they can feel that positive energy and if they feel like they have found the right place for them, where they can feel comfortable and open up about sensitive issues, and that we’re going to do a good job for them, that means we are hitting lawyering the way it should be exactly how we want. So 10 years later, that mission statement has worked out really well for us.

Kevin Daisey:
I love it, that’s awesome and that’s so important, your culture, your people, everything, how important that is to have not, I mean, just so your clients, it rubs off on them, but also just in general, like running a practice for long term and keeping good people and enjoying because you’re there, more than half your life is probably spent working so, why not enjoy it? Yeah, kudos for you on that.

Kevin Daisey:
One of the things that I say too, actually I have another podcast, a personal podcast that I just put out, basically my thoughts. But your entire business, the processes, the people, the blue wall behind you, everything is your marketing and so everything you do, the way everything looks, how you handle a client, how you take the calls, how you mentioned like the lawyers, like they weren’t responsive in the beginning that you saw, they didn’t follow up, they didn’t let you know what’s going on. Like all those things, that’s us, all you are marketing right there in a sense, right? It’s not advertising, it’s not those things but it’s how you carry yourself and how you represent yourself, which seems like you’ve done a very good job of doing that well.

Eido Walny:
We cut really hard, I tell people all the time that common courtesy is the least common thing in the world. It’s amazing how much credit you can get for just doing the things that your mom told you to do when you were six, right? Return phone calls, return emails, even if you don’t have the answer, I may not have the answer, but I’m going to reply to an email and say, “Listen, I got your email, I’m going to look into that. I will get back to you.” If I tell them, I’m going to get back to them Friday and I get busy, I tell them on Thursday that it’s going to be a little bit more time, I don’t wait till Monday and apologize for being late. Again, just common courtesy, it’s what you’d want to have to happen to you if you were on the other side and yet it’s so uncommon amongst lawyers.

Eido Walny:
I’m as busy as anyone and so I get it that people are busy, but so are the people that we’re working with.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah.

Eido Walny:
And they have expectations too and our goal is not only to meet those expectations, but exceed them. It’s incredible that common courtesy is all it takes to exceed those expectations.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah, a 100 percent. To me, bad news is better than no news, especially when you’re in a service type relationship and that’s saying, “Hey, we can’t do this, where I can’t do that. Where I looked into it, I still need more time.” Or, “Hey, I’m going to be late for that so let’s push it a day.” I’ve never had a client get mad because we let them know that something’s late or it’s going to be pushed or we still need time or we don’t have the answer, just follow up with them every day and they’re not going to be mad. Actually, so to prove that he is true to his word, we actually had this schedule for about a half hour ago originally and yesterday Eido had called my company and said, “Hey, I need to move this up a half hour.”

Kevin Daisey:
Well, it didn’t get moved on the actual calendar so I was on, a half hour ago. “Wow, where’s Eido at?” So I called him, let some voicemails, sent an email, I hit him in every way I could. I was like, “Hey, I’m here. If you need to reschedule, let me know.” So then I went off and started making me a sausage biscuit and Edo calls me and he is like, “Hey, I apologize but I moved the meeting up 30 minutes yesterday.” and I said, “You know what? You are a 100 percent correct but the meeting didn’t get moved.” I’m busy, I just went on with my schedule and jumped on here a half hour ago. So, but either goes, I don’t want you to think that I missed something because he’s like, “I hate that, I don’t let that happen.” So I believe him a 100 percent because he was generally concerned that he thought that I thought he was late or busy or something like that.

Eido Walny:
I wanted you to finish your biscuit before you hopped on so you’d have energy for the call.

Kevin Daisey:
He let me eat my biscuit and I’m ready to go, let’s do this. I really appreciate that but I think everything you’re saying a 100 percent agree with and I talked to a lot of attorneys, just the show alone of course we have clients, but they are busy. All of them are busy and everyone says they’re busy. I say I’m busy all day too, but you can’t let that become an excuse for missing meetings, not following up with clients or just blowing people off because this is more important than that. It’s easy to get caught up I think and that’s why like trial attorneys, they’re a much more difficult client for us, I’ll tell you that because they don’t show up for meetings, they’re never available. So it’s a harder client to deal with.

Eido Walny:
We take our entire careers to build our reputations and it’s so hard to do that to your point, so hard to build the brand, you put so much effort into it and it’s so easy to mess it up. Right?

Kevin Daisey:
It’s very easy.

Eido Walny:
And people will complain far more easily than they’ll give you compliments. I work really hard because I don’t know, who knows who and who’s related to who. We laugh here in Milwaukee, we’re in a really big small city. It’s like one and a half degrees of separation. Everybody knows everybody, even though there’s millions of people here. You just never know who’s friends or related or went to school with whoever. And so I treat them like they’re all my clients or potential clients or the parents of my clients and I think that’s just how you need to do it, that’s how you build your reputation.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah, it is like pulling teeth to get someone to leave you a good review or would you do a testimonial for us or whatever, but you do something bad and it’s-

Eido Walny:
One star is easy to give.

Kevin Daisey:
It’s easy to get that. So yeah, a 100 percent. All right, switching topics a little bit. What are some of the things you have done now? Again, I love the culture, I love everything you’ve done with the business, how it’s operating, how you care about the client, how you respond from a marketing, outbound marketing, getting clients perspective outside of referrals. What have you all done that has worked well, it may be something that hasn’t worked well.

Eido Walny:
So it’s interesting, my first day of work at the big firm that recruited me to come to Milwaukee was September 4th, 2001. It was a Tuesday, it was the Tuesday after labor day and so I had a really great first week and the second week started out, not so great. It was a really weird time, and at the time I was assigned a mentor because everything was going kind of crazy. My mentor told me a really important thing that sticks with me here, even 20 years later.

Eido Walny:
He said, “The firm can take everything away from you. They can take away your salary, they can take away your office, your assistants, your programs, everything. There are two things that the firm can’t take away from you. The first is your knowledge base and so spend whatever time you need to become an expert in the field that you’re pursuing. It doesn’t matter what it is, get to be the best at that. The other thing the firm can never take away from you is your contacts so get out there and start meeting as many people as you can, from wherever you can.” and so those things have stuck with me ever since.

Eido Walny:
I try to meet as many people as I can, in whatever manner that I can. It is incredible. The kinds of people who are out and about not just in Milwaukee, I’m all over the country, but it’s great to have context in different places and get those referrals, if someone is looking for an expert in a field that we happen to service or need someone in Milwaukee or whatever the case may be, it’s been incredible and doesn’t take time and effort, doesn’t mean I’m away from my office out meeting with people or having lunch or flying somewhere to have a really important meeting. Sure, but those are investments. Those not a waste of my time and early in my career, some of the firms I was with saw that as a waste of time. If you’re not at your desk billing, you aren’t being productive. But to me, it was the opposite. It was an investment in my future and so that’s worked out incredibly well.

Eido Walny:
Even now I get calls all the time from people who say, “Hey, do you happen to know someone in this city or this state or who can help me there?” I’m a go-to person for those sorts of referrals, which makes me a hub of information, which is incredibly helpful.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah, I love that.

Eido Walny:
Being an expert in the field, it has allowed me to leverage that knowledge into articles and speeches and opportunities to market myself in ways where I don’t have to pay for the marketing, I’m actually paid to do the marketing, and I’m a thought leader and I’m someone whose opinion matters. Sure, it takes some time to do that but again, the investment in time, reading those extra articles laying in bed, when I can’t get my mind to turn off, it has been an incredible investment in my future that’s paid off massive dividends.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah, Who and all around. When I started my business back in 2006, I didn’t know anyone, I moved to a new area. I had to go meet people, I had to go network, I had to build it from the ground up and I think too, I want my network, I want this, I want that, I want to be an industry leader that takes time, that takes investment. You might as well get started as soon as possible because that does not happen overnight, people don’t build trust with you overnight. You can’t join an organization and now everyone’s going to buy from you tomorrow. It can take years for people to start to say, “Yeah right, this person’s real deal and I have some trust in them and I’ll refer them to someone else.”

Kevin Daisey:
I think it’s also great to be a referral partner in sense of like, I keep a sheet of all the services that we don’t provide, legal services, CPAs, anything that my client may need, that we don’t do, that they might just come and say, “Hey, I really need to,” I had an attorney in Richmond, Virginia, who’s about to become a client, they’ve already asked, “Hey, we really need help with our taxes” and they’re an injury attorney. I said, “No problem, I got a whole list of CPAs, some in your area so I’m not in your area. Let me know what you need. I trust every one of them.” And so becoming that resource, I think is not just for what you do, but other relationships that you’ve built and it sounds like you’re doing that too. So, be the hub. Right?

Eido Walny:
Don’t keep score. The biggest bit of advice I have for people is they keep score. They say, “Well, I owe this person a referral and this person owes me two referrals.”

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah.

Eido Walny:
Forget about it, don’t keep score.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah.

Eido Walny:
Be helpful and the help comes back. One referral is not necessarily worth another referral, that referrals aren’t all equal. We work with a lot of financial advisors, for example, and I have financial advisors tell me, “Well, I referred a client to this attorney and he never referred anything back or I referred three people to him and he only referred one back.” OK, well, when we are engaged, we are providing a service and then when that service is done, the engagement ends and we’re not making a lot of money, unless it’s a particular kind of case.

Eido Walny:
We’re not generally making a lot of money on any one engagement but the one referral that, that attorney may have given the financial advisor, could have been an evergreen client, depending on the services that the financial advisor’s being engaged for, whether it’s investment work or advisory work or life insurance, those are paying pretty good fees on an annual or even quarterly basis.

Kevin Daisey:
For years.

Eido Walny:
So if it was a one for one referral that wasn’t equal? Maybe you need to give 10 referrals to equalize the revenue that was generated. For me, the best way to approach it is don’t keep score. If there’s an opportunity to refer, just refer to the best person who will do a good job for your client, make sure that person is going to take good care of you and your reputation. Do the same when those referrals come back to you and you’ll be super happy if you just don’t keep score.

Kevin Daisey:
Yeah, I like that too. We don’t do referral fees for any other part like some people, “Hey, I’m going to refer you to this. I want 10% of the contract amount, every month.” I’m like, nah, we’ll help the client. We can help them but we don’t ask for a referral fee from anybody. So, “Hey, we’re going to send you this person because we trust you’re going to do a good job.” That’s it, we don’t ever ask for a fee and sometimes they offer them and we’re just like, “We’re fine, we don’t need that.” [crosstalk 00:24:09] It shades send us back a referral in the future, we’d be happy.

Eido Walny:
Absolutely, it shades the referral. If the client knows that you are getting paid to make the referral, it brings into question the referral itself. So we’ve been asked to get licensed for insurance so that we can share in the revenue and we just choose not to do that. Does it leave some money on the table? I’m sure it does. But at the end of the day, what it allows us to do is have better relationships with our clients, be able to do analysis on the products they’re bringing us better and with clean hands and we don’t have to do all these disclaimers. It’s just a way, better way to have a relationship with your clients.

Kevin Daisey:
A hundred percent, a hundred percent agree. Well, next question and then we’ll wrap up here from there. I love everything you’re doing and I think we agree on a lot of things, very similar but different business, but that’s cool. What are your plans for the next couple years? What goals do you have? Say 2022 and beyond the next 3, 5 years, what’s in your mind as hopefully COVID starts to go away and not become a prominent year. What are you guys looking at doing?

Eido Walny:
I’m really excited that over the last 10 years, we’ve experienced year over year growth for 10 consecutive years. So, my goal is to continue to experience that kind of growth. I know we’ve got a couple of additional attorneys coming on-board, already in 2022 so the firm is going to continue to grow. We’ve always tried to add one or two additional attorneys a year and that’s already, that box has been checked for 2022. We want to keep doing that. There’s going to be a lot of demand for state planning works simply because Congress keeps tinkering with the tax laws and with inflation and all the things going on there’s just a high demand for estate planning.

Eido Walny:
Unfortunately, or fortunately for our business, people continue to pass away and there are a lot of administrations and contentious administrations are on the rise. Families are just fighting over more and more things, as society goes so to goes these administration. We want to keep having steady growth, I think we can have a really excellent, national and even international practice with a dozen attorneys. We don’t need hundreds of attorneys. We can do a great job with a really succinct group and I’m proud of the team that we’ve been able to assemble and want to keep adding to that.

Kevin Daisey:
Awesome! Excellent, I love it. Well, congrats on the growth so far and [crosstalk 00:26:33] you, yeah, without a doubt, I think you’ll be on that same path. Anything else you’d like to add? Before we go, everyone too real quick, check out the website again, it’s at the bottom of your screen, it’s walnylegal.com. If you’re listening on the podcast, audio, anything else you want to add or is what’s the best way for people to connect with you if they need to reach out?

Eido Walny:
When your name is Edo, you’re pretty easy to find. So, go to the website, my contact information is there otherwise, if you just Google E I D O, which is my first name, I will probably be the name that comes up first. My mom had loved the name IO ITO with Salmon’s prophet in the old Testament and my mom liked the name, but had no idea how to spell it. She guessed and she guessed wrong, which was not so fun as a kid, but has proved to be amazing, for branding purposes as an adult, I’m Bono, I’m Madonna, I’m EIDO.

Kevin Daisey:
That’s awesome. No, that’s a good point, it was funny. If you Google my name exactly Kevin Daisy, which is D a I S E Y, there E there I come up all over Google, whatever my business partner, who wishes that for himself is Eric Olson and there’s like a thousand million of them, who? How? So you got a unique name, that’s great. It’s easy for people to remember you and they Google you and they’re going to find you. You mentioned too, you’re speaking, actually. You’re going to be in Virginia Beach where I’m from.

Eido Walny:
I am.

Kevin Daisey:
Speaking at a state plan in conference it sounds like. So, tell us more about that before we wrap up.

Eido Walny:
Yeah, I’m on the national board of the national association of estate planners and councils and one of the things we do is sometimes go out and speak to one of the 274 councils around the country and one of the councils that reached out to me recently to come out and speak in the early spring is the Virginia Beach estate planning group.

Kevin Daisey:
Well, I might have told them about you. That’s good. I’m look forward to when you come, I’m definitely going to take you to lunch or dinner.

Eido Walny:
That’d be Awesome.

Kevin Daisey:
You choose, dinner or lunch or both. We’ll meet up for sure, but thanks so much for coming on the show and spending some time with us. I love what you’re doing, I think everyone listening should rethink about what they’re doing. If they’re not already doing what you’re doing and take a step back. If you’ve got a busy schedule guys, you’re busy, you’re running around, you’re missing meetings, you’re not emailing, not calling your clients, that you need to take care of that. So figure out a way to do it and take it serious. So a lot of good lessons for you from you today Eido, I appreciate it.

Eido Walny:
Thanks, Kevin. I appreciate you having me.

Kevin Daisey:
Everyone, you can take a look. Eido’s episode will be up soon on our website, Rayla.com/podcast. It’ll also be up on our YouTube channel, it’ll be on the podcast version as audio, as soon as it gets edited. I think we have a pretty good backlog so that’ll be up probably in the next couple weeks. Look forward to seeing Eido on our social media, so we’ll be posting him up on stories in Instagram and Facebook and LinkedIn, you’ll see his beautiful face all over his place. If you need help with marketing in your law firm, reach out to us. That’s what we do, websites, SEO, advertising, social media. When you have an awesome culture and brand like Eido has, makes a job even easier. Get out in front of the right clients, the right prospects and just drive more business. So, that’s all I got today. Eido, thanks so much. Everyone have a great day.

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